Vitamin C Section

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As you can see from the above graphs, if you take Vitamin C orally you can only achieve a maximum blood plasma Vitamin C level of about 200 umol/L.  However, if you give Vitamin C intravenously you can achieve levels that are 50 times higher.  In most cases it is these higher levels that are most effective in treating some serious medical issues such as sepsis.

Dr. Paul Marik: The Cure for Sepsis

To me the amazing thing is that it took so long for someone to try high dose intravenous vitamin c to treat sepsis.  The average mortality rate for sepsis is about 40% in developed countries and 60% in undeveloped countries.  It seems that this rate of death can be reduced drastically by using Dr. Marik's protocol.

Observations on the Dose and Administration of Ascorbic Acid

The following pdf file talks about how Dr Fred Klenner used high doses of vitamin c (injected and/or intravenous) to treat various maladies starting in the 1940's.  It all sounds too good to be true.  However, the work of Dr. Marik as per the above video seems to show that Dr. Klenner may have been on to something.

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Vitamin C and Cancer: Part I

The jury is still out on whether or not intravenous vitamin C is useful in cancer treatment.  This is a two part video with the second video posted below.

Vitamin C and Cancer: Part II

This is a continuation of the video that is posted above.

Vitamin C as an Adjunctive Cancer Care

Vitamin C seems to be most helpful when used along with standard cancer treatments.

Vitamin C and Heart Disease: Part I

 It seems that vitamin C deficiency could contribute to heart disease.  In an effort to keep the cholesterol theory of heart disease alive the medical establishment has gone from blaming LDL to small LDL and now LPa (LP little a).  It could be another case of blaming the fire truck for the fire because every time you see a fire there is a fire truck there.  It could be that LDL (in the form of LPa) is there to fix the problem and does not cause it. 

Vitamin C and Heart Disease: Part II

It seems that vitamin C deficiency could contribute to heart disease.